Jazz Music Discussion

jazz

#61

Looks like Iberia is available on “Time Changes”


#62

this guy is doing some crazy stuff in the Jazz realm…


#63

This is currently my most favorite upright bass player. In fact he is the best I have ever heard. This is a video of a studio performance. Talk about “Lightning Fast” Don’t miss this. If your a jazz fan, this may make your day. The drummer is pretty awesome too.


#64

Ok… I am back. Let’s get this Jazz discussion fired up again. I also chat on the classical thread. It’s a challenge. On one hand, you look at the technical aspects of the recording and how it is presented through speakers or headphones. And then there is the is the “artistic quality.” I will say that I can hear and feel the artistic quality better when I listen on headphones. But sometimes I just love encompassing my listening area through speakers. Let’s start burning up this Jazz discussion. and what is “Jazz”?


#65

Good question. I personally like to hear the separation and clarity of the pieces, especially in the bop, post bop and modern jazz era. I’ve been listening to a lot of Rudy van Gelder’s remasters and I like the precision of them.

Artistry wise, you can’t beat pieces like “So What” by Miles Davis. There is a building conversation among the instruments until the crescendo and final resolution. To me it is possibly the best jazz performance ever recorded.


#66

I got my first intro to Jazz through my parents, my uncle used to arrange for a lot of big bands so I was always aware of ‘classic’ jazz. It was artists like Al DiMeola, Santana, Youngbloods, Canned Heat that led me very quietly towards more modern Jazz. The only forms I really can’t get into are some of the more free form versions, some of it sounds seriously discordant to me.
I almost hate to say it but some of the more schmatzy lite Jazz is a good gateway into more ‘serious’ (whatever that means) jazz.


#67

Seriously discordant can be great. I highly recommend “Creative Orchestra Music 1976” by Anthony Braxton. Lest you think that there is not an incredible amount of structure and thought behind it, try listening to Track 3, which is a march. Your 4th of July backyard party taking a detour into the Twilight Zone. The link here is to You Tube, but the album is available on Deezer and Spotify also.

Then again, I never found the high energy improv of Coltrane or Dolphy hard to listen to.

“All hail eris! All hail discordia! Fnord?”


#68

@pennstac @Lotek I’ve found that listening to challenging works at low volumes as background music can help you unravel it.


#69

Okay Point taken, however I’m not sure I can ever get into Keith Jarret (sp?) I tried the Koln Concert once and it was like fingernails on a blackboard, but I’m older now, my taste has changed so who knows.
One artist I really like and recommend as a gateway drug is Steven Khan. Nice mix of rock guitar and Jazz movements with some serious sidemen.
Damn now I’m going to have to get Arrows and Blue Man out and spin that.
( Track Some Punk Funk is a great headphone/iem track imho).


#70

Jarret is great live. Or at least he was when I saw him in the late 70s. I do like Koln Concert. @z0rk 's remark about low volume can help you unravel. Yes.

HOWEVER . . . Much of what you hear first as discord is really deconstruction, not demolition. Just like on the cooking shows, you can take a familiar dish and deconstruct the flavors and ingredients and experience it in a new way, and it’s just as good.

So try to find a nice quality stream (or vinyl) of that Anthony Braxton march. Play it at full marching band levels. And I predict you will enjoy the brilliant deconstruction of John Philip Sousa.


#71

okay okay, can’t say I’m totally closed minded. My task for the weekend is to find the Koln Concert and really listen to it (I know low volume). I do have some Anthony Braxton somewhere, or did before I lost a few boxes of LPs during a move.


#72

@prfallon69 I never had Southern Comfort before. Bought my first bottle today (went for the 100% proof) and some Stone Tangerine Express IPA (also a 1st). It’s around 30° C here in Seattle today, so this hits the spot. Half way through ‘Annihilation’ right now. Sorry, for the off-topic post, but I wanted to give you shout-out of approval. Cheers


#73

Great, glad to hear your enjoying it. Enjoy your session. :tropical_drink::grin:

-Paul-


#74

Fellow Seattle-ite!


#75

@DarthPool I was hanging out at a friend’s place in West Seattle, but actually live in Everett (for now). Small world. Cheers


#76

I live out in Snoqualmie ridge so I get it, easier to say Seattle :wink:


#77

Really need to get some of your Seattle (and close-by) types out here.

Music, drinks, unobstructed view of Puget Sound/Elliot Bay … and “wagging it” for a nice mid-week afternoon off work.


#78

Pssst! I thought I’d keep this strictly among us Jazz guys. Not posting it over at Music that Thrills You. This is really too good for them. No secret. The second Weather Report album. I think it won the Downbeat album of the year for 1972. “I Sing the Body Electric” sure I like “Heavy Weather” and “Sweetnighter” just as much as anyone. But that early album. So good. I did stage crew for the Penn State Jazz Club, and got to do 2 Weather Report concerts.

The vinyl is a little hard to find, but you can get good streams on Deezer, Spotify, and Tidal.


#79

OK OK, @Carmantom - I got up from the computer so I could listen to your Christian McBride YouTube more clearly, and it was very good. I wanted to pay back by sending out something from Steve Smith and Vital Information, but You Tube serendipity happened and I found this wonderful clip.

Mercy Mercy Mercy was my late Sister-in-Law’s favorite jazz tune, and my late Father-in-Law was a Lt. Col. in the Air Force. So maybe this means a little extra to me.


#80

Oh man, them are some “cool cats” . Drummer’s has got some serious foot pedal action going on. Oh those Big Bands era.
Thanks for the share .