Any Guitar Players Here?


#21

Nice to have you here Edmond. The 310ce is a fantastic guitar! 45 years of playing guitar, wow! What type of music do you usually play?


#22

I play a Castteluccia Nympheas: http://www.castelluccia.fr/produit/nympheas/
No amp for the moment…


#23

That looks cool Dub. I’ve never heard of that brand. How does it sound?


#24

J.B. Castelluccia is a luthier who makes “gypsy [“manouches”] guitars as did his father Jacques C, and is grand father (alors names Jean-Baptiste): I bought it because I had, a long time ago, the “same on” made by his father (but it has become unusable and unplayable). I was surprised rediscovering how it sounds: a strong and plain “cristal” tune as gypsy — and very strong B and E cords. J’ai aussi une guitare de jazz manouche de chez Gérôme, dont le son est beaucoup plus medium (this one: http://guitarejazzmanouche.com/forum/download/file.php?id=2140 ).
The Nympheas is very different: Ii projects its soundmuch more than the other, no need an amp to hear it!


#25

That is so cool! Is it a custom made or a standard version?


#26

The Gérôme was custom made: the guitar neck was a little more thin than the one he usually made and the radius a little stronger, and the radius was different — that allows the action to be low and very comfortable and easy to play.
I bought a used Nympheas a month ago — it comes with full lacker in- and outside — but no piezzo bridge and standart mechanics: I’ll have to go to Paris and have it changed, may be next year, but all changes can be made by J.Castelluccia on his own guitars.


#27

I like low actions. The first thing I did with my D-28 is to lower the action. I thought the Taylors I have tried played nicely out of the box. It seems you like the guitars made by Castellucia. Are they local to France only? I think it is cool if a great luthier makes a custom guitar just for you.


#28

Castelluccia’s action is just a little higher than the one Gérôme did — but, of course, it sounds more gypsy (gypsy’s afficionado would reject what I asked to Gérôme: please don’t tell them!)…
Castelluccia has his luthier workshop in Paris since 1940 — but his guitars can be bought everywhere and shipped (in a Hiscox case, it can travel safely). I think one can asked him for special customisations, but the problem is that it would be better to meet him…


#29

Hi Luke… I like electric blues (Alvin Lee, Joe Bonamassa, Steve Ray Vaughan, and so on…) for my Ibanez. Taylor for all music!


#30

Call me Arnold.

I like blues as well, SRV, Jeff Beck, Clapton, etc. I have not considered Ibanez for my future electric guitar purchase. Why did you choose it over say Strat, Tele or Les Paul?


#31

I love hollow body guitars… And Ibanez is a good value for money guitar… I’d always like a 345 Gibson but it’s too much expensive…


#32

Thanks for that. I have my eyes set on the Gibson Les Paul Tribute but I will include Ibanez in the mix. Cheers.


#33

Just to ask how long did it take you to learn to play the guitar? Is it very difficult and time consuming?


#34

I was taught to do it quite quickly. Basically my middle school had an 8th grade program that some kids (including myself) got accepted into where there were two teachers who taught that group most subjects, and at the end of the school day for the equivalent of one class those teachers would teach you to play songs.

So basically, I learned how to play guitar without needing to know how to read music sheets just by having what equates to a mentor showing me how to play songs for maybe a half hour to an hour a day, 5 days a week. We periodically did performances, so it took maybe 2 months tops of that regiment to learn to play 5 or so songs for each performance.

So my advice is find a mentor who can show you how to play actual songs and skip the reading music sheets business, and it can be a fast process.


#35

Agreed. Skip all those music sheets. The first couple of months will be crucial if you will continue or stop. Once you get past the first couple of months, I think it will easy and enjoyable by then.


#36

Well… I began to learn I was fifteen — forty years later, I play a little better…


#37

Not bad. After 40 more years, you will even be a little bit better. LOL.


#38

Not sure — perhaps with another 40 years after the next 40 ones…


#39

Nah, I’m sure you will be alright after 40 years. Just don’t forget to practice once every month. LOL.


#40

no! I’ll pratice as I always did: every day…